Treated Seed: Great for Your Field, But Bad for Your Grain Bin

As the season moves from spring planting to fall harvest, please keep in mind that all of the elevators within CHS adhere to a zero tolerance policy for treated seed occurring in grain. With this in mind, please take time to ensure all equipment is thoroughly cleaned and inspected before using it to haul grain.

Keep these tips in mind to ensure your grain remains free of treated seed:

  • When borrowing equipment, ask questions about past use. If you plan to borrow equipment to move grain, it’s important to know what the equipment has handled in the past.  Don’t forget to do your own inspection of the equipment before use, too.
  • Remember that a visual inspection is not enough. Seeds can get stuck in the smallest of spaces, and there are a number of crevices in equipment that cannot be seen with the naked eye.  Pressure washing to ensure a thorough cleaning is recommended.
  • When in doubt, keep equipment separate. The best way to ensure no cross-contamination occurs is to keep separate the equipment that hauls seed and the equipment that hauls grain.

The team at CHS is here to ensure your farm is successful, from spring planting to fall harvest and every moment in between.  Contact a member of our grain team for additional information on our zero tolerance policy and what’s happening in the grain markets.

ATV Safety This Season

ATVs are different than other vehicles, as well from one another. Make sure you know the unique operating procedures for the ATV you are riding. Remember to be cautious and to know the limitations of both your skill and the equipment. Serious injury can result from improper use of these machines.

Below are key points to inspecting and operating your ATV safely:
Inspect Before You Ride
– Tires and wheels
– Controls and cables
– Lights and electrical
– Oil and fuel

Reading Terrain
– Know the land you are riding on and the limitations of your machine
– Stay away from dangerous terrain, such as steep slopes, swamps, or tall grasses
– When dismounting the ATV, watch carefully for mud, holes, ruts, or other obstacles that could trip you up

Proper Speed
– Always look ahead and choose a speed that is proper for the terrain, visibility, operating conditions, and your experience.
– Pick the safest paths of travel around or over hazards.
– Adjust your speed well in advance when approaching a hazard.

Travel Safely Up and Down Hills
– Some hills are just too steep for your ATV – if the hill you are approaching looks too steep, it probably is.
– When approaching an uphill climb, move up on the seat and lean forward.
– Do not attempt to ride backward down a hill – should you begin rolling backward, do not apply the rear break abruptly.

Agellum™: A Winning Game Plan

Agellum™ — a full-farm planning and management solution from CHS — integrates, aggregates, and activates your farm’s unique data from machinery, apps, equipment, and more. Agellum empowers better agronomic and economic decisions through planning, analysis, and collaboration.

Just like every smart coach has a detailed playbook, Agellum includes a robust farm planning tool that helps to extend your farm’s winning streak. Follow along below as we compare using Agellum to executing a winning football game and how to use Agellum to have a winning growing season not only this year, but for years to come.


Planning

Just like any good football coach, success on your farm doesn’t start at kickoff. You’ve been preparing for this growing season all year long – and Agellum’s all-in-one farm plan will help you easily manage your growing season playbook. Work with your local CHS Agronomy Sales Team to get your game plan ready today and into the next season.

Planting & the Early Growing Season

You made your game plan in Agellum, figuring out what works best in your field, and ran some plays through the first half of the growing season. Now that it’s halftime, it’s time to go back and review those plays to ensure the most successful second half possible. Review your early growing season in Agellum and work with your local team at CHS to make some adjustments to your farm plan to finish the game strong!

Late Growing Season

Worried about your crops falling behind in the second half? Navigate the rest of this growing season using Agellum features such as geo-specific scouting notes, soil sampling points and in-season imagery to make sure you are striving for the crop’s full potential.  Proper planning and data management will make this third quarter one to remember!

Harvest & Growing Season Review

In the fourth quarter, you need that extra boost to finish strong and come out on top. Look no further than Agellum to manage your risks, plan for the finish, and monitor what solutions and tools have worked throughout the game to add to your farm’s winning record! After the game, don’t forget to update your records to ensure the most accurate break-evens get reflected for each of your fields.


Are you ready to be a champion this season? With a variety of actionable tools and features, Agellum brings your data to life and takes your operation to the next level, all season long. Contact your local CHS agronomy sales representative or CHS Yieldpoint® Specialist for more information about how Agellum can fit on your acres.

June 20th Scouting Report

Curious what’s happening throughout our territory?  Members of our agronomy team weigh in below with what they’re seeing in fields so far this season.

 

Aaron Helbling Scouting Report
CHS New Horizons in French

Corn: A lot of corn fields are growing really fast, and early sprays have been keeping most fields really clean. Keep checking on fields as they get close to canopy, remembering that chemical options start to get fewer and fewer as your corn grows. We are also getting to the stages where tissue testing will show fertilizer needs.

Soybeans: Pre’s worked great this year but are breaking down fast. Throwing in some residual for late flushing weeds such as waterhemp on these passes should get you to canopy really clean. Be aware of dicamba deadlines, and have a backup plan ready. With a lot of moisture and beans getting close to flowering, remember last year’s issues with white mold and ask about fungicide timings.

Wheat: Wheat is approaching heading fast, we have seen great results with fungicide treatment at heading (especially in moist conditions).

Alfalfa: Seeing more alfalfa weevil this year, after first cutting is a prime time to be watching for weevils.

 

Sam Westby Scouting Report
CHS New Horizons in Chokio

In our area, corn is sitting around V5-V6, and spraying is going well so far.  Soybeans are all over the board as far as stages – averages are around V3-V4, and they are looking good.  The eastern part of our territory is looking a bit too wet, and around Chokio things are okay but still a little on the wet side.  looking forward, continue monitoring weeds and get them sprayed as needed, especially as things begin to dry up in the next week.

 

James Svendsgaard Scouting Report
CHS New Horizons in Fergus East

Our area is wet, with 2-3” of rain over the weekend.  On the plus side, we have enough moisture in the ground with a good number of GDUs already, so it’s a ‘good problem’ to have as the crops are growing well.  Beans are starting to get weedy, so now is the time to get them sprayed. Corn has been growing extremely fast and a lot is already canopied.  With this in mind, we are in our last push for corn topdressing.  Wheat is looking very good – the majority is finished with topdressing.  With wheat, think about fungicide as they move into heading to help prevent dockage at elevators in the fall.

June 8th Scouting Report

 

Curious what’s happening throughout our territory?  Members of our agronomy team weigh in below with what they’re seeing in fields so far this season.

Sam Westby Scouting Report
CHS New Horizons in Chokio

     Corn: Corn is anywhere from V3-V5 stage around here. We are starting to see more and more weeds poking through in fields that had pre-emergence chemistry applied. (more…)

Grain Markets Update

By Rich Cole, Grain Manager

 

Corn quality and railroad performance have been the two main features in the grain world lately. Robust corn exports off the PNW has created a much needed and welcome demand boost, along with some basis opportunity; but all the demand leaves us prone to railroad performance. The snow and cold temperatures that occurred along the PNW corridor in February hampered BNSF movement, slowed them down considerably, and spiked car values. This created a logistics knot that has taken quite a few weeks to untie and pushed back loadings at our elevators as we waited for cars. Recently, the BNSF has finally started catching up and has been pushing in train after train close together, making it quite a challenging situation at our locations.

Quality is the next big issue this year that we are struggling with. Early this winter it seemed the cold temperatures were causing the corn to crack and break but as the weather has warmed up we are still dealing with high amounts of FM. Perhaps this is related to growing degree days, the maturity of the corn, or maybe the speed of drying. Regardless of the reasons for it, we are continuing to struggle with quality and have a big book of trains yet to load in the coming months. We have taken discounts on everything from grades to screenings generated to demurrage on trains as loading has taken considerable effort. We appreciate your understanding and effort also as we’ve gone from sitting full waiting on trains to taking deliveries on extended hours to get these trains loaded.

From a market point of view, next up is the March 29th acreage report. Trade guesses are for the U.S. to plant more soybeans than corn for the first time in over 30 years. Time will tell what the actual numbers will be but it is certain to cause some volatility in our already volatile markets. Planting season is right around the corner and we want to wish everyone a safe and productive spring!

 

This material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS Hedging, LLC. and should be considered a solicitation.  This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information and is intended only for the use of the individual or entity to which it is addressed.  If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any unauthorized dissemination, distribution, and/or use of this communication is strictly prohibited.  CHS Hedging, LLC. makes no representation or warranty regarding the correctness of any information contained herein, or the appropriateness of any transaction for any person.  There is a risk of loss when trading commodity futures and options. 

 

Unlock More Potential with CHS Unlocked™

By Byron Fischer, CHS Key Agronomy Specialist

There are many growth regulators on the market.  Why choose CHS Unlocked?  CHS Unlocked contains naturally derived Cytokinin, Auxins, and Gibberellins in the right balance to improve growth and development of many crops.  Having the right balance is actually of more importance than having greater amounts when it comes to plant growth regulators (PGRs).  PGRs are important because they induce cell division, stimulate cell enlargement, delay senescence (loss of cell division and growth), overcome stress and improve nutrient mobilization.

One feature that causes CHS Unlocked to stand out when compared to other products on the market is that it is naturally derived.  This enables CHS Unlocked to be in a formulation that “fits” into the plant receptors, due to its natural derivation.  This enables quicker uptake and thus increased activity.  Bottom line is increased ROI.

Below is a photo of CHS Unlocked compared to a competitive product, which was taken during the 2017 growing season at a trial in Staples, MN.  You can easily see the difference CHS Unlocked makes in the plant!

Interested in learning more about CHS Unlocked?  Contact a member of our agronomy staff for more information about this product and what else CHS can do to support your farm in 2018!

February 28 Grain Market Update

 

By Tom Bovee, CHS New Horizons Grain Procurement

 

Argentina is all the rage and all eyes are focused on it, as the country has driven the market well beyond most forecasters’ expectations. Rain makes grain; therefore, this week was the first time someone lowered expected bean yields out of Argentina since the drought started. This also shows us just how resilient people believe these crops can be. Still, any reduction in yield means more of an export market for those looking to export beans.  Beans are $0.74 higher and corn $0.25 higher than they were on Jan 1st. Funds have now started to go long  on beans and corn, positioning themselves to defend this rally. Slow planting progress on Brazil’s 2nd crop is leading corn to new highs. It appears Brazil is as wet as Argentina is dry.

Marketing: Beans seem to find a high during the day/night before trailing off before the close of each market. This is the prime example of why you need to have offers in place with your marketer. Corn looks to finally test the magic $4.00 futures number as we push on that wall of resistance. It’s a large hurdle but one that, if overcome, should lead us to some great opportunities. As always with a weather driven market, be ready to make a move.

For more on the current state of the markets and what contracting opportunities are available, contact a member of your CHS New Horizons grain team.

 

This material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS Hedging, LLC. and should be considered a solicitation.  This communication may contain privileged and/or confidential information and is intended only for the use of the individual or entity to which it is addressed.  If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any unauthorized dissemination, distribution, and/or use of this communication is strictly prohibited.  CHS Hedging, LLC. makes no representation or warranty regarding the correctness of any information contained herein, or the appropriateness of any transaction for any person.  There is a risk of loss when trading commodity futures and options. 

B20 Workshop Series

Were you aware that beginning May 1, 2018, the minimum biodiesel requirement in Minnesota’s No. 2 diesel fuel increases to 20 percent during warm weather months?  Industry partners are hosting informational seminars in Minnesota to provide additional information on this change.  As this is a change that will impact our AFD and fuel customers, we encourage you to attend a seminar if you are able to learn more about how this will impact you.

Topics include:

  • History and overview of the law
  • Compliance
  • Diesel & biodiesel basics
  • Storage, handling, and use best practices
  • Blending in spring and fall
  • Identifying, treating and preventing common diesel issues

 

Speakers include individuals from the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, Minnesota Department of Commerce, Weights & Measures Division, and MEG Corp Fuel Consulting.

Below are the upcoming event dates and locations.  If you plan to attend, please RSVP to 952-473-0044 or Jennifer@megcorpmn.comAs always, contact your CHS energy department with any questions you may have.

Upcoming Events:

Monday, March 5

Mankato – 11:30AM to 2:00PM (lunch included)

Courtyard by Marriot Event Center: 901 Raintree Road

 

Tuesday, March 6

Worthington – 8:30AM to 11:00AM (breakfast included)

Worthington Event Center: 1447 Prairie Drive

 

Marshall – 2:30PM to 4:30PM

AmericInn Lodge & Suites: 1406 E. Lyon St

 

Wednesday, March 7

Willmar – 11:30AM to 2:00PM (lunch included)

American Legion: 220 19th Ave SW

 

Tuesday, March 13

Alexandria – 11:30AM to 2:00PM (lunch included)

Holiday Inn: 5637 Highway 29 South

 

Wednesday, March 14

Moorhead – 8:30AM to 11:00AM (breakfast included)

Courtyard by Marriott: 1080 28th Avenue South

 

Tuesday, March 20

Winona – 11:30AM to 2:00PM (lunch included)

The Plaza Hotel & Suites: 1025 Highway 61 E

 

Wednesday, March 21

Rochester – 8:30AM to 11:00AM (breakfast included)

Hampton Inn & Suites: 2870 59th Street NW

 

Albert Lea – 2:30PM to 4:30PM

Leo Carey American Legion Post 56: 142 N Broadway Ave

 

Thursday, March 22

St. Cloud – 11:30AM to 2:00PM (lunch included)

Courtyard by Marriott: 404 W St Germain St

White Mold Management Practices

By Brian Oachs, CHS Agronomy Sales Representative

Last year, a number of areas within our trade territory had the ideal conditions for white mold, with wet and humid weather conditions.  If you’re wondering how to reduce your risk of white mold, keep the below tips in mind as you make your plans for 2018.

  • Identify which fields you saw white mold in last year and the year prior. Sclerotia, the fungus that causes white mold, can survive in soybean residue and in the soil, making it important to note where it has existed in the past.
  • Give consideration to your crop rotation. If white mold is a big issue on specific acres, consider giving an extra year before you plant soybeans on those acres again.
  • Make your soybean selection carefully. Choose a bean with a higher white mold tolerance, or look for a plant that growers taller with less foliage to trap in moisture.
  • Plant in wider rows. Greater row spacing allows for more air movement between the plants, decreasing the environment that white mold thrives in.
  • Consider fungicide or herbicide applications, as appropriate.

Concerned about the potential for white mold on your acres in 2018?  Curious what seed options there are to help set your field up on the right foot?  Contact your Agronomy Sales Representative for additional information.

© 2020 CHS Inc.

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